Menu Close

What started the First Great Awakening?

What started the First Great Awakening?

By the eve of the American Revolution, their evangelical converts accounted for about ten percent of all southern churchgoers. The First Great Awakening also gained impetus from the wideranging American travels of an English preacher, George Whitefield.

What events led to the Great Awakening?

In 1692 the Salem witch trials began, leading to the accusation of 150 people of witchcraft. Nineteen innocent people, mostly women, were hanged as a result. This is one of the events that led to Great Awakening.

What caused the Great Awakening quizlet?

The movement was a reaction against the waning of religion and the spread of skepticism during the Enlightenment of the 1700s. The First Great Awakening broke the monopoly of the Puritan church as colonists began pursuing diverse religious affiliations and interpreting the Bible for themselves.

What caused the First Great Awakening Apush?

Protestant ministers in the 1730s began to push back against the cerebral nature of religion, which dictated what faith looked like in the colonies. The result was the First Great Awakening, an era of great change for religion in America.

What are three effects of the Great Awakening?

Long term effects of the Great Awakening were the decline of Quakers, Anglicans, and Congregationalists as the Presbyterians and Baptists increased. It also caused an emergence in black Protestantism, religious toleration, an emphasis on inner experience, and denominationalism.

What was the First Great Awakening quizlet?

The Great Awakening was a movement that altered religious beliefs, practices and relationships in the American colonies. The First Great Awakening broke the monopoly of the Puritan church as colonists began pursuing diverse religious affiliations and interpreting the Bible for themselves.

What’s the difference between the first and second great awakening?

The First Great Awakening was a period of religious revival that encouraged individuals to pursue the knowledge of God and self. On the other hand, the Second Great Awakening contradicted the assertion of the first great awakening during which the doctrine of predestination was introduced and taught.